Canadian Legislation


Adoption in Canada is a provincial matter and every province has a different adoption law. To learn more about your adult adopted child or birth family, you must contact the province in which the adoption was finalized. Please see sections on individual provinces for more detailed information. 



ALBERTA
On November 1, 2004 Alberta began allowing adopted adults and their birth parents access to identifying information about each other.


I was born and adopted in Alberta. I want to learn the names of my birth parents. What should I do?
If you were adopted in Alberta and are at least 18 years old you can receive identifying information about your birth parents. This will likely include their names, their place of birth, and age and a copy of any documents in your adoption file.

You can also apply for your Adoption Order. This is the official document that marks your adoption.  If you were adopted between July 1, 1966 and July 1, 1985 your birth surname will not be on your Adoption Order. You can request that the Post Adoption Registry (PAR) send you your birth surname as it will not appear on your Adoption Order.

To apply for this information go to this site and follow the links to the form, Request for Release of Information.

You can also apply for non-identifying background information about your birth parents.  This is information that your birth mother gave the social worker at the time she surrendered you for adoption. It might include information about her province of birth, marital status, occupation, and education level. It will also likely give you her physical description and information about her personality, interests, and medical history.  There may be similar information about your birth father. It is important to remember that this is information that was supplied at the time of your adoption and has not been updated since.  You will need to make a written request for this information. Go to this site for more information about the application process for Biological Background Information.


I’ve decided that I want to meet my birth mother. What can I do?
The first thing you should do is place your name on the passive registry operated by PAR. You will find the application, called Application for Voluntary Contact, at this site. Once they have received your application, the social workers will check the registry to discover if a member of your birth family has also registered. If they find the name of a birth family member on the registry, they will notify you both that there is a match and ask how you would like to proceed. If you both want to move forward, the social worker will help to facilitate your reunion.

If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry. If a member of your birth family registers in the future the social worker will call you and let you know.


I surrendered a child to adoption in Alberta. Now that child is an adult and I’d like to know more about him/her what can I do?
If you child is at least 18 years and 6 months old, you can apply for identifying information about him/her. You will find the application and more information about the application process at this site.

You can also apply for background information about your child’s adoptive family. This information was collected at the time the family adopted your child. It will not give you the names of the adoptive parents but it may tell you where they were born, their marital status, occupations, and the level of education they attained. It may also provide a physical description and describe their personalities and interests. You will need to send a written request to PAR to receive this information.


I am a birth mother. I would like to find my adult child. What can I do?
Contact PAR and have your name placed on the registry.  A social worker will search to discover whether your adult child has place his/her name on the registry.  If so, the social worker will contact you and facilitate your reunion. If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry. If your adult children registers in the future, the social worker will contact you. Go tothis site to find the registry application form.


I am a birth father. I want to meet my adult child. What can I do?
You can register with the registry operated by PAR. If your name is on the birth registration or you are named in the adoption records, you can apply for identifying information about your adult child. Please see the section for Alberta Birth Mothers for the application process.


I am a birth sibling. What can I do?    
You can register with the registry. A social worker will contact you when there is a match. 


I am the adult child/grandchild of an adoptee. What can I do?
If the adoptee is deceased, you can place your name on the registry and request identifying information about your birth relatives.


I am a birth relative e.g. birth grandparent, birth aunt. What can I do?
If the birth parent is deceased, you can place your name on the registry. 


Will the Alberta government search for the adult child I surrendered to adoption or for my birth parent?
No. The government does not do searches.


I am an adopted adult or a birth parent. I am open to contact but I want to control how and when it happens. How can I do that?
You can fill out a Contact Preference Form. On this form you can indicate when and how you would like to be contacted. Click here to download the application and more information about contact preference.


I am finding the reunion experience to be emotional. Who can I talk to?
PAR will provide you with the names of therapists, local support groups, and reading material that will help you learn more about this life-changing event.


Is there any way that I can be blocked from receiving identifying information about my birth parent/adult child?  Is there any way I can be blocked from contacting my birth parent/adult child?
Both adoptees and birth parents can file a disclosure veto. This document will block the government’s ability to release any identifying information to the other party. The disclosure veto is in effect until two years after the death of the person who filled it out. 

In some instances the adoptive parents of an adopted adult can apply for a disclosure veto.  If they can demonstrate that the adoptee does not know of his/her adoption and that learning of it will cause him/her harm, the adoptive parents can apply to the ministry for a disclosure veto. The minister will make decisions on a case by case basis and make his/her decision based on the best interests in the adoptee.

It is important to recognize that very few people file vetoes. The majority or adoptees and birth parents welcome contact.


I am the adoptive parent of a child who is under 18. I know my child would benefit from learning more about his/her birth family. How can I find this information?
You can apply for non-identifying information about your child’s birth family through PAR.  You can also place your name on the registry. If there is a match with your child’s birth relative, PAR will contact you.


To contact PAR:
Post Adoption Registry
11th Floor, Sterling Place
9940 - 106 Street
Edmonton, AB
T5K 2N2
Phone: (780) 427-6387
Fax: (780) 427-2048
To be connected toll free from anywhere in Alberta, dial 310-0000 then dial (780) 427-6387

E-mail:  postadoption.registry@gov.ab.ca
Website: www.child.alberta.ca/home/602.cfm


Back to Top


 



BRITISH COLUMBIA

British Columbia was the first province in Canada to open adoption records. Since 1996 both adopted adults and their birth parents have been able to access information about each other from the original and amended birth registrations.

I was adopted in BC. I want to learn the names of my birth parents.
What should I do?

If you were adopted in BC and are at least 19 years old you can access your original birth registration (OBR). This document was created at the time of your birth and names your birth mother and, in some cases, your birth father.  

You can also apply for your Adoption Order. This is the official document that marks your adoption. Once you have received your OBR you can apply for your original birth records.  When your birth mother was considering adoption, the social workers created a file about her. They did the same for your adoptive parents.  The Adoption Reunion Registry will copy these two files and send them to you.  The files will give you background information about your birth family. 


I’ve decided that I want to meet my birth mother. What can I do?
The first thing you should do is place your name on the passive registry operated by the ARR. There is a $25.00 fee for placing your name on the registry. Once they have received your application, the social workers will check the registry to discover if a member of your birth family has also registered. If they find the name of a birth family member on the registry, they will notify you both that there is a match and ask how you would like to proceed. If you both want to move forward, the social worker will help to facilitate your reunion.

If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry. If a member of your birth family registers in the future the social worker will call you and let you know.

If there is no match you may want to have the ARR search on your behalf for your birth mother or father. If your birth parents are deceased, you can request a search for a birth sibling. The first search will cost you $250. Each subsequent search will cost you $180. If your birth relative agrees to contact, the social worker will help facilitate your reunion.


I surrendered a child to adoption in BC. Now that child is an adult and I’d like to know more about him/her what can I do?
When your child was adopted, his/her birth registration was amended to show the names of his/her adoptive parents and the adoptee’s name after adoption. Once your child is 19 years old, you are entitled to a copy of this amended document. It will give you the name the adoptee received after his/her adoption. The names of the adoptive parents will be blacked out.  You are also entitled to receive the Adoption Order.

You can also receive the original birth registration which shows that you gave birth to the child.  Many birth mothers find having a copy of this document to be very healing. Please note that there is a $50 administrative fee for these documents. Once you have these documents you can apply for a copy of the files created about you and the adoptive family at the time of the adoption. Again, any identifying information about the adoptive parents will be removed.


I am a birth mother. I would like to find my adult child.  What can I do?
Contact the ARR and have your name placed on the registry. A social worker will search to discover whether your adult child has place his/her name on the registry. If so, the social worker will contact you and facilitate your reunion.

If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry. If your adult child registers in the future, the social worker will contact you. After you have received a copy of the OBR, you can request that the ARR search for your adult child. Please note that there is a $250 fee for a search.

I am a birth father.  I want to meet my adult child. What can I do?
You can register with the registry operated by the ARR provided you are named in the adoption file, on the OBR, or if you signed the adoption consent form. If your name is on the OBR or if you signed the consent form at the time of the adoption, you can request that the ARR do a search for your adult child.  Unfortunately, you cannot request a search if you are named in the file but not on the OBR or the consent form.


I am a birth sibling. What can I do?    
You can register with the registry. A social worker will contact you when there is a match.  If the birth parent that you and the adoptee share is deceased you can request a search for the adoptee.


I am the child/grandchild of an adoptee. What can I do?
You can place your name on the registry. If the adoptee is deceased you can apply for a search for the adoptee’s birth parents. If they are deceased, you can request a search for the adoptee’s birth sibling.


I am a birth relative e.g. birth grandparent, birth aunt. What can I do?
You can place your name on the registry. If the adoptee registers, a social worker will contact you.


I am finding the reunion experience to be emotional. Who can I talk to?
The ARR has counselors who are happy to talk with you. You may prefer to talk with a counselor who is not affiliated with the government. The ARR can provide you with a list of therapists and counselors whom you may choose to contact. The ARR also has adoption related articles that may help you understand the changes occurring in your life.


Is there any way that I can be blocked from receiving identifying information about my birth parent/adult child? Is there any way I can be blocked from contacting my birth parent/adult child?
If the adoption took place before November 1996, both adoptees and birth parents can file a disclosure veto. This document will block the government’s ability to release any identifying information about the other party. The disclosure veto is in effect until two years after the death of the person who filled it out.

All adopted adults and birth parents have the option of filing a No-contact Declaration. This document allows the government to release identifying information about the other party but forbids you to contact them. Before the government will give you any information you must sign a document stating that you will not contact and will have no one else contact your birth relative. If you disregard the No-contact Declaration, you can be fined $10 000 or receive 6 months in jail.

When submitting a veto, the applicant is given the opportunity to provide a written statement. In it s/he might provide medical information or explain why s/he feels s/he cannot give you information or meet you at this time. It is important to recognize that very few people file vetoes. The majority or adoptees and birth parents welcome contact.


To Contact the Adoption Reunion Registry:
Ministry of Children and Family Development
Adoption Reunion Registry
PO Box 9705 Prov Govt
Victoria BC  V8W 9S1
Telephone:  (250)387-3660
Fax: (250) 356-1864
For toll-free access within BC call (604)660-2421 (within Vancouver) or 1-800-883-7867 (elsewhere in BC) and ask to have your call transferred to (250) 387-3660.

Website: www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/adoption/reunion/index.htm


Back to Top


 



MANITOBA

The Manitoba government will not release identifying information about adoptees or birth parents without their consent. They do provide a number of services that make it easier for adoptees and birth relatives to find each other. For more information about the Post-Adoption Registry and to find an address from which you can request an application, go to www.gov.mb.ca/fs/childfam/registry.html.


I am a Manitoba adoptee, birth parent, or adult birth sibling. I want to find my birth parent, adult child or sibling. What can I do?

  • Request non-identifying information from the Manitoba Post-Adoption Registry. This information will not tell you the name of the person you are seeking but it will tell you something about their family. It is a written summary of information collected at the time of the adoption and may include information about their ethnicity, education, occupations, religion, physical appearance, and interests.

     
  • Place your name on the registry. The government will check to see if your adult child or birth relative has place his/her name on the registry. If s/he has done so the government will contact you both and facilitate a reunion.

     
  • Request that the government do a search for your birth relative or adult child. Due to the volume of applicants for this service it can take over a year for a search to be completed. When the government finds your adult child or birth relative, they will ask him/her if s/he would like to meet you. Most people do want to meet their birth relative and the government will then facilitate a reunion. In some cases, however, the adoptee or both relative may refuse contact or choose to file a contact or disclosure veto.


I am finding the idea of reunion emotional. My birth relative denied contact with me. Is there someone I can talk to?
The Post-Adoption Registry has counselors who would be happy to speak with you.


How long will it take to receive non-identifying information or to have a search done?
Your non-identifying information will arrive in under three months. The Post-Adoption Registry will likely be ready to start a search 12 months after receiving your application.


To contact Post-Adoption Registry:
Post Adoption Registry
Child & Family Services
201, 114 Garry Street
Winnipeg MB R3C 4V5
Telephone: (204) 945-6964
Fax: (204) 948-2949 

Website: www.gov.mb.ca/fs/childfam/registry.html


Back to Top


 



NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

On April 30, 2003 Newfoundland and Labrador became the second Canadian province to open adoption records to adult adoptees and their birth parents.


I was adopted in Newfoundland. I want to learn the names of my birth parents. What should I do?
If you were adopted in Newfoundland and are at least 19 years old you can access your original birth registration (OBR). This document was created at the time of your birth and names your birth mother and, in some cases, your birth father.  

You can also apply for your Adoption Order. This is the official document that marks your adoption. For more information about the process go to this site.  Follow the links to find the application forms. You must pay a $50.00 administration fee at the time of your application.

To find out more information about your birth family you can request non-identifying information from Newfoundland’s Post-Adoption Services. They will send you a summary of information compiled from the information they received from your birth mother at the time of your adoption. It will tell you about your birth mother’s interests and education, her family and their ages, occupations, and religion. It may also give you some information about your birth father and his family.

Post-Adoption Services does not have a website. Call them at 709-752-4406 for more information. They estimate that you will receive your non-identifying information package about a year after your apply for it.


I’ve decided that I want to meet my birth mother. What can I do?
The first thing you should do is place your name on the passive registry operated by Newfoundland’s Post-Adoption Services. Once they have received your application, the social workers will check the registry to discover if a member of your birth family has also registered. If they find the name of a birth family member on the registry, they will notify you both that there is a match and ask how you would like to proceed. If you both want to move forward, the social worker will help to facilitate your reunion.

If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry.  If a member of your birth family registers in the future the social worker will call and let you know. You may also want to have Post-Adoption Services search on your behalf for your birth mother, father, sibling, or grandparent. 

Call Post-Adoption Services at 709-752-4406 for more information about the registry and searches. Please note that you must have your original birth registration before Post-Adoption Services will allow you to request a search. Searches take about five years to complete.


I surrendered a child to adoption in Newfoundland. Now that child is an adult and I’d like to know more about him/her what can I do?
When your child was adopted, his/her birth registration was amended to show the names of his/her adoptive parents and the adoptee’s name after adoption.

Once your child is 19 years old, you are entitled to a copy of this amended document. It will give you the name the adoptee received after his/her adoption. The names of the adoptive parents will be blacked out.  You are also entitled to receive the Adoption Order.

You can also receive the original birth registration which shows that you gave birth to the child. Many birth mothers find having a copy of this document to be very healing. Go to www.gov.nl.ca/cyfs/adoptions/index.html#access for application forms.  Please note that there is a $50 administrative fee for these documents.

If you would like to know more about your child’s adoptive family, you may contact Post-Adoption Services and request that they send you non-identifying information about your child’s family. You will receive a written summary of information compiled by social workers about the adoptive family at the time of the adoption. It may contain information about their ethnicity, religion, education, interests, and employment. You can reach Post-Adoption Services at 709-752-4406.


I am a birth mother. I would like to find my adult child. What can I do?
Contact Post-Adoption Services and have your name placed on the registry. A social worker will search to discover whether your adult child has place his/her name on the registry. If so, the social worker will contact you and facilitate your reunion.

If there is no match, your name will stay on the registry. If your adult children registers in the future, the social worker will contact you. After you have received a copy of the OBR, you can request that Post-Adoption Services search for your adult child.  

Contact Post-Adoption Services at 709-752-4406 for more information about the registry and searches. Please note that it may take five years for Post-Adoption Services to complete a search.


I am a birth father. I want to meet my adult child. What can I do?
You can register with the registry operated by Post-Adoption Services provided you are named in the adoption file, on the OBR, or if you signed the adoption consent form. You may also request that Post-Adoption Services do a search for your adult child.


I am the child/grandchild of an adoptee. What can I do?
If the adoptee is deceased you can apply for a search for the adoptee’s birth parents or another birth relative.


I am finding the reunion experience to be emotional. Who can I talk to?
Post-Adoption Services maintains a list of qualified therapists whom you can choose to contact.


Is there any way that I can be blocked from receiving identifying information about my birth parent/adult child? Is there any way I can be blocked from contacting my birth parent/adopted child?
All adopted adults (18 and older) and birth parents have the option of filing a no-contact declaration. This document allows the government to release identifying information about the other party but forbids you to contact them. Before the government will give you any information you must sign a document stating that you will not contact and will have no one else contact your birth relative. If you disregard the no-contact declaration, you can be fined $10 000.

Adoptees (18 and older) and birth parents can also choose file a disclosure veto. This document will block the government’s ability to release any identifying information about the other party. 

When submitting a veto, the applicant is given the opportunity to provide a written statement. In it s/he might provide medical information or explain why s/he feels s/he cannot give you information or meet you at this time. It is important to recognize that very few people file vetoes. The majority or adoptees and birth parents welcome contact.


To contact Post Adoption Services:
Post Adoption Services
Viking Building - 3rd Floor
PO Box 13122
St. John's NF A1B 4A4
Telephone: (709) 752-4406
Fax:  (709) 752-4400

Website: www.gov.nl.ca/cyfs/adoptions/index.html#access


Back to Top


 



NEW BRUNSWICK

The New Brunswick government will not release identifying information about adoptees or birth parents without the consent of the other party.  They do provide a number of services that make it easier for adoptees and birth relatives to find each other. You will find more information about the Post-Adoption Register and contact information here.


I was adopted in New Brunswick or am the birth parent/sibling of a New Brunswick adoptee.  I want to find my birth parent or adult child/sibling.  What can I do?

  1. You may request non-identifying information about the adult adoptee/ birth relative.  Adoptees will receive information about  the age, ethnicity, education, occupation, physical appearance, and interest of their birth parents.  Birth parents and siblings will receive similar information about the adoptee’s adoptive family. Once your application is received, it will take about 12  months for the Register to send you the non-identifying information. Contact the Post-Adoption Register for more information and application forms.

     
  2. You may place your name on the registry.  The government will check the registry to determine whether the adoptee/birth  relative has also registered.  If so, they will facilitate a reunion.  If not, your name will stay on the registry until there is a match. Contact the Post-Adoption Register for more information and application forms.

     
  3. You may request that the government conduct a search for the adoptee/birth relative.  Once your application is received, it will take about 12 months before the Register will begin your search. Contact the Post-Adoption Register for more information and application forms.  If a birth father is named on the birth registration or in the file, the Post-Adoption Disclosure Registry will search for him.


To contact the Post Adoption Register:
Post Adoption Disclosure Services
Department of Family & Community Services
P.O. 6000
Fredericton NB E3B 5H1
Telephone: (506) 453-2949
Fax: (506) 462-5150
E-mail: postadoptionservices@gnb.ca
Website: app.infoaa.7700.gnb.ca

 

Back to Top


 



NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

I am an adoptee/birthparent. The adoption was finalized in the Northwest Territories. I want to search for my birth parent/adult child. What can I do?
The government of the Northwest Territories has services in place that may help you reunite.

  1. You may apply for non-identifying background information.  Adoptees may receive information that was recorded at the time of the adoption about their birth parents and may include their appearance, interests, ethnicity, education, occupational skills, and religion. Birth parents will receive similar information about the adoptee’s adoptive family.

     
  2. You may place your name on the passive registry. If the person you are seeking also registers, the government will facilitate a reunion.

     
  3. You may request that the government searches for your adult child or birth parent.  If the person sought agrees to contact, the government will facilitate a reunion.

     
  4. If the adoption took place after November 1, 1998 the adopted adult and his/her birth parents may request the original birth registration which will contain identifying information for both the birth parent(s) and the adoptee.


To learn how to request these services please contact the NWT government at:
Department of Health & Social Services
Box 1320
Yellowknife NT X1A 2L9
Telephone: (867) -873-7991
Fax: (867) 873-7706
http://www.hlthss.gov.nt.ca/english/services/adoption/pdf/post_adoption_services.pdf
 

Back to Top


 



NOVA SCOTIA

The Nova Scotia government will not release the names of adoptees or birth parents without their consent.  They do, however, offer some services to make your search easier.  For more information about Nova Scotia’s adoption disclosure services and to learn how to register, please go to www.gov.ns.ca/coms/families/adoption/AdoptionDisclosure.html.


I was adopted/surrendered a child for adoption in Nova Scotia.  Now I would like to find him/her. What can I do?

  1. Register with the Passive Adoption Register.  When you register the government will send you non-identifying information about your adult child or birth parents.  This is a written summary of information  collected at the time of the adoption and may include information on the other person’s interest, education, medical history, and physical appearance.

    At this point, the government will check to see if your adult child or birth parent is also on the register. If s/he has registered, the government will facilitate a reunion.  If not, your name will remain on the register.


     
  2. Request that the government search for your birth parent/adult child.  When the government finds the other person, they will ask him/her if s/he would like to be contacted by you.  In most cases, the other person is happy to be found. However, if s/he declines contact the government will not release any information to you.  If the government, cannot find the other person they will not release any information to you.


I am an adult birth sibling of an adoptee.  I would like to find my sibling. What can I do?
You can request non-identifying information, place your name on the Passive Adoption Register, and request a search with the written permission of the parent you share with the adoptee.


To contact Adoption Disclosure Services:
Adoption Disclosure Services Program
Department of Community Services
PO Box 696
Halifax NS B3J 2T7
Telephone: (902) 424-2755
Fax: (902) 424-0708
Website: www.gov.ns.ca/coms/families/adoption/AdoptionDisclosure.html
 

Back to Top


 



NUNAVUT
 

When Nunavut became a territory in 1999, its government simply chose to keep its adoption disclosure laws in place.  As a result, Nunavut has the same access to information as the Northwest Territories. 

Adopted adults and their birth parents can request non-identifying information, place their names on a registry, and request a search for the other party.

Nunavut does not have website describing these services.  For more information, contact the Director of Adoption at 867-975-5781.

 

Back to Top


 



ONTARIO

On June 1, 2009 Ontario became the fourth province to open adoption records to adopted adults and birth parents.

I am an Ontario adoptee/birth mother. I want to find my birth family/adult child. What can I do?

 

  1. If you are adopted and at least 18 years old, apply for your original birth registration. Your original birth registrations will provide you with your name at the time of your birth, the name of your birth mother when you were born, and, in some cases, the name of your birth father. You may also apply for the Adoption Order.

    If you are a birth mother, apply for your adult child’s (aged 19+) amended birth registration. The amended birth registration will provide you with the name of your child after adoption. You may also apply for a copy of the original birth registration. Many birth mothers find it healing to receive this document.

    Applications can be found at www.serviceontraio.ca.

     
  2. Apply for non-identifying information. This is information compiled at the time of the adoption and will provide background information about the adoptee’s birth and adoptive families. You will either receive a summery of the information compiled by a social worker or a copy of the original file with all identifying information removed. For more information, please go to www.serviceontaio.ca.

     
  3. File a Notice of Contact Preference. If your birth parent/adult child applies for the amended/original birth certificate, s/he will receive your Notice of Contact Preference at the same time. You can use the form to tell your birth parent/adult child how and when you would like to be contacted and provide them with updated contact information. The application for a Notice of Contact Preference can also be found at www.serviceontario.ca.

     
  4. Place your name on the Adoption Disclosure Register. This is a government operated registry. You name will be placed on a list. If your birth relative/adult child has also applied to the register, you will both be notified. Applications for the registry can be found at www.serviceontario.ca.

 

Is there any way that I can be blocked from receiving identifying information about my birth parent/adult child? Is there any way I can be blocked from contacting my birth parent/adult child?

If the adoption took place before September 2008, both adoptees and birth parents can file a disclosure veto. This document will block the government’s ability to release any identifying information about the other party. The disclosure veto is in effect until the death of the person who filled it out.

All adopted adults and birth parents have the option of filing a No-contact Notice. This document allows the government to release identifying information about the other party but forbids you to contact them. Before the government will give you any information you must sign a document stating that you will not contact and will have no one else contact your birth relative. If you disregard the No-contact Notice, you can be fined up to $50 000.

When submitting a veto, the applicant is given the opportunity to provide a written statement. In it s/he might provide medical information or explain why s/he feels s/he cannot give you information or meet you at this time.

It is important to recognize that very few people file vetoes. The majority or adoptees and birth parents welcome contact.

 

I am a birth father. What can I do?

If you are named on the original birth registration, you may apply for all the same information available to birth mothers. Please see above for more details. All birth fathers can apply for non-identifying information and place their name on the Adoption Disclosure Register.

 

I am a birth relative. What can I do?

You can apply for non-identifying information about the adoptee. Applications forms are available at www.serviceontario.ca. You can also place your name on the Adoption Disclosure Register. If the adoptee also applies to the Register, the government will notify you both. Applications for the register can be found at www.serviceontario.ca.
 


For more information go to:
ServiceOntario at www.serviceonatrio.ca
 


 

Back to Top


 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

I was adopted in PEI and want to find my birth family. What can I do?
The PEI government will not provide you with the names of your birth parents but they do provide some services that make it easier for you to find them. Contact Post-Adoption Services for more information and application forms. You will find them at www.gov.pe.ca/infopei/index.php3?number=18537. The wait time for receiving non-identifying information and searches is quite lengthy because the government recently eliminated a position in Post-Adoption Services. Wait time for services is more than three years.

  1. Contact Post-Adoption Services and request a copy of your non-identifying information. This is information collected at the time of your adoption and will give you background information about your birth family.  It may contain information about the age, ethnic background, education, occupation, religion, and interests of your birth parents.

     
  2. Ask to have you name placed on the registry. There is a $35 fee for this service. The government will search and if a birth relative has also placed his/her name on the registry, the government will facilitate a reunion. Both you and your birth relative must pay $70 before the government will facilitate the reunion.

     
  3. Request that the government do a search for your birth parent or birth sibling (if that sibling has been adopted by another family.)  There is a $150 fee for searches. The government will search for a birth father if he is named in the file.


I surrendered a child in PEI and want to find him/her.  What can I do?
The PEI government will not provide you with the name of your adult child but do provide some services that make it easier for you to find him/her.

  1. Contact Post-Adoption Services and request a copy of non-identifying information about your child and his/her adoptive family.

     
  2. Ask to have your name placed on the registry.  If your adult child has also placed his/her name on the registry, the government  will facilitate a reunion. There is a $35 fee for placing your name on the registry and an additional $70 fee for a match.


I am a birth relative.  What can I do?
You can place your name on the registry.  The fees are the same as those for adoptees and birth parents.  If you are a birth sibling and the birth parent that you share with the adoptee is deceased, you may request non-identifying information about the adoptee.


I am finding all of this emotional. What can I do?
Post-Adoption Services offers counseling and can make referrals to private counselors.  Contact them for more information.


To contact Post Adoption Services:
Department of Health & Social Services
16 Garfield Street
Charlottetown PE C1A 6A5
Telephone: (902) 368-6130
Website: www.gov.pe.ca/infopei/index.php3?number=18537


Back to Top


 



QUEBEC

Quebec’s adoption disclosure program differs from that found in other provinces. Rather than contact a central government-operated registry, adoptees and birth parents must contact the Centre Jeunesse (social service agency) in the region where the adoption took place.

I am an adoptee or birth parent and want to find my adult child/birth parent. What can I do?
Send a written request to the Centre Jeunesse in the region where the adoption took place.  Ask for:

  • non-identifying information
  • the given names of the adoptee before adoption*
  • any sealed personal letters left in your file by your adult child/birth parent
  • the application for the passive registry
  • the application for a paid search

You should also send a letter addressed to your adult child/birth parent and ask that it be placed in his/her file. Make sure that you seal the envelope and place it, along with a covering letter, in another envelope addressed to the Centre Jeunesse.  If your adult child/birth parent searches for you in the future, s/he will receive the letter and be able to contact you.

Each Centre Jeunesse performs searches on behalf of adopted adults and birth parents. However, in many cases the wait for a search may be as along as a decade. After you send in your application, make sure that you call back at least once a year to enquire about the status of your application. You want to ensure that your application continues to move up the line and it seems that searches may not always be done in order of application. There is no longer any fee for this service. Quebec will give priority for searches when the birth parent is over 70 years of age.

If you do not know which Centre Jeunesse, handled the adoption check on the Certificate of Judgment which will list the court and area where the adoption took place. If you do not have the Certificate of Judgment, you will have to write to each Centre Jeunesse and enquire whether they handled the adoption.

You will find a list of the Centres Jeunesse on the website of Mouvement Retrouvailles at www.mouvement-retrouvailles.qc.ca.

Please visit the website of Parent Finders Ottawa for additional information about Quebec searches. www.parentfindersottawa.ca


* Please read if you are Catholic. Many adoptees in Quebec do not have information about a birth last name. If they do, they need to be careful because often the surname

is fictitious; it was created at the time of the adoption and does not reflect the actual

surname of the birth mother. If a surname is listed, adoptees may wish to ask whether

it is a "fictitious" name or the “real thing."

The Catholic Church generated Baptism Certificate was traditionally used as the Birth Certificate. Only in the last few years have new "civil" Birth Certificates been issued.

Many Baptism Certificates do not include a last name.

 

Back to Top


 



SASKATCHEWAN

I was adopted/surrendered a child to adoption in Saskatchewan.  I want to find my adult child/birth parent.  What can I do?
You can request non-identifying background information from Post Adoption Services.  Adoptees will receive information about their birth parents that was collected at the time the adoption took place.  It might include information on the birth parents’ interests, appearance, occupational skills, and ethnic background. Birth parents will receive similar information about the adoptee’s adoptive family.

Adopted adults may apply for a copy of their Order of Adoption. This contains their name at birth. You can also place your name on the passive registry. If your birth parent or adult child has also registered Post Adoption Services will facilitate a reunion.

You may also request that Post Adoption Services search for your birth parent/adult child.  If your adult child/birth parent agrees to contact, Post Adoption Services will facilitate a reunion.  A birth father need not be named on the original birth registration in order to request a search.  If he is named in the file, he may request a search and an adoptee may request a search be done for him.

If the adoption took place after April 1, 1997 then both adopted adults and their birth parents may request a copy of the original birth registration.  This will contain the adoptee’s name at birth and after adoption as well as the name(s) of the birth parent(s.)  Adopted adults and birth parents may choose to file a disclosure veto should they not want this information released.

To learn more about Post Adoption Services and find contact information, please visit
http://www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/adoption/post


I am adopted and I have reunited with my birth parent. We both would like a copy of my original birth registration.  What can we do?
If your adoption took place before April 1, 1997 and both you and your birth parent request a copy of your birth registration, Post Adoption Services will release it to you.  Please note that permission is required from all people named on the birth registration so if it names your birth father you will also need his permission


I am the adoptive parent of a child. I know my child would benefit from knowing more abut his/her birth family. What can I do?
You can request non-identify information about your child’s birth family from Post Adoption Services. You may request a copy of the Order of Adoption; this will provide you with your child’s name at birth.  You can also place your name on the passive registry.  If your child’s birth parent has also registered, Post Adoption Services will facilitate a reunion.  You may also request that Post Adoption Serves search for your child’s birth parents.  If the birth parents agree to contact, Post Adoption Services will facilitate a reunion.

To learn more about Post Adoption Services and find contact information, please visit www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/adoptionpost .


I am a birth sibling or grandparent.  I want to find my sibling/grandchild. 
What can I do?

With the consent of the birth mother you can request non-identifying information and that Post Adoption Services search for the adopted adult.


To learn more about Post Adoption Services, please visit:
Post Adoption Registry
Saskatchewan Community Resources
11th Flr 1920 Broad St
Regina SK S4P 3V6
Telephone: (306) 787-3654
Toll Free: 1-800-667-7539
Fax: (306) 798-0038
Website: www.socialservices.gov.sk.ca/adoptions/post


Back to Top


 



YUKON

I am a Yukon adoptee/birth parent. I want to find my birth family/adult child. What can I do?

1.  If you are adopted and at least 19 years old, apply for your original birth registration. Your original birth registrations will provide you with your name at the time of your birth, the name of your birth mother when you were born, and, in some cases, the name of your birth father. You may also apply for the Adoption Order.

If you are a birth mother, apply for your adult child’s (aged 19+) amended birth registration and the Adoption Order. The amended birth registration will provide you with the name of your child after adoption. You may also apply for a copy of the original birth registration. Many birth mothers find it healing to receive this document. If you are a birth father and you are named on the original birth registration you may apply for the original birth registration, the Adoption order, and the amended birth registration.

2.  Apply for non-identifying information. This is information compiled at the time of the adoption and will provide background information about the adoptee’s birth and adoptive families. The adoptee will receive information collected at the time of the adoption that describes his/her birth parents. It may include their interests, occupational skills, appearance, ethnicity, and education. Birth parents will receive similar information about the adoptee’s adoptive family. The wait for non-identifying information is about four months

3.  Place your name on the government operated registry. Your name will be placed on a list. If your birth relative/adult child has also applied to the register, you will both be notified. If a birth father is named in the file, he may place his name on the registry.

4.  Once you have received a copy of the original and/or amended birth registration information, request that the government search for their birth parents/adult child. If the adoptee/birth parent agrees to contact the government will facilitate a reunion. Searches usually begin two years after the Adoption Disclosure Registry receives the application. If a birth father is named on the original birth certificate, was interviewed at the time of surrender, or signed a declaration of paternity he may apply for a search to be done on his behalf and his adult child may request that a search for him. If he is named in the file, he may place his name on the registry. Adoptees may request a search for a birth parent, birth grandparent, adult birth sibling, or other adult birth relative.

Is there any way that I can be blocked from receiving identifying information about my birth parent/adult child? Is there any way I can be blocked from contacting my birth parent/adult child?
Adoptees (18 and older) and birth parents (named on the original birth registration) can file a disclosure veto. This document will block the government’s ability to release any identifying information about the other party. The disclosure veto is in effect until two years after the death of the person who filed it out.

Adopted adults (aged 18 and older) and birth parents (named on the original birth registration) have the option of filing a No-contact Declaration. This document allows the government to release identifying information about the other party but forbids you to contact them. Before the government will give you any information you must sign a document stating that you will not contact and will have no one else contact your birth relative.

When submitting a veto, the applicant is given the opportunity to provide a written statement. In it s/he might provide medical information or explain why s/he feels s/he cannot give you information or meet you at this time.

It is important to recognize that very few people file vetoes. The majority or adoptees and birth parents welcome contact.

I am a relative of an adopted person. How can I find more information about a missing family member?
Relatives of adopted adults may place their name on the registry. If a match occurs, the government will notify both parties and facilitate a reunion.

If the adoptee is deceased, the following people may apply to have a search done for a birth relative: adult child or grandchild of the adoptee, adoptive parents of the adoptee if the adoptee was a minor at the time of his/her death.

If the birth parent is deceased, an adult child of the birth parents may apply for a search for the adult adoptee.
 

How can I find out more information?
Call or write them for more information.

Adoption Disclosure Registry
Family & Children Services
Health & Social Services
Government of Yukon
PO Box 2703 H10
Whitehorse YT Y1A 2C6
Telephone: (867) 667-3002
Fax:  (867) 393-6204
Toll Free (In Yukon) 1-800-661-0408 (ext 3002)
http://www.hss.gov.yk.ca/adoption.php
 

Back to Top